OUR PAST

In 2017 TUANZ celebrates 30 years of influencing change.  To mark that milestone we commissioned a brief history of the changes in the telecommunications market over that time, and the impact that TUANZ had.  On this page you can read a summary of that history. .  Further down the page, you can also see a complete list of the leaders that have committed time and effort to leading the organisation over its 30 years.

If you click on the cover here you can download the whole document as a readable PDF

 

The beginning of a User group who became lobbyists

TUANZ had its genesis at a Computer Society meeting in September 1985, when it was decided that a telecommunications association ‘of some kind’ was needed.  The idea behind the association was that it would provide an opportunity for people using Post Office data services to get together and learn from each other rather than it being a lobby group – something they saw no need for at the time.

The first AGM was held on February 26, 1986, establishing a constitution for the association and its name, and on March 20th, 1987, TUANZ was officially incorporated.  Terry Ballard was the first chairperson as TUANZ had decided to be gender neutral with its titles, and for the first year TUANZ was all about education, running seminars and holding meeting for users.

Then in 1984, the Labour Government had begun a period of reforms and on the 1st April 1987, the New Zealand Post Office was split into three businesses and Telecom Corporation of New Zealand created. Telecom acquired the assets of the New Zealand Post Office and a new –  commercial – business was born.  TUANZ were suddenly thrust into the role of lobbyists as Telecom jostled to establish its stake in the market as deregulation loomed.

In 1989, in a world first, the New Zealand telecommunications market was completely deregulated ending the monopoly and opening the doors for new competition.

The first of the competitors arrived in 1990 in the form of the Alternative Telephone Company – better known to most by its later name, Clear Communications. The same year, Telecom was privatised with Ameritech, Bell Atlantic, Faye Richwhite and Freightways buying it for NZ$4.25 billion.

 

Welcome to the age of ‘light handed regulation’ – and some early competition

The early 1990s was the era when the New Zealand Government was taking a hands off approach to regulation in the sector.  Many other countries provided statutory rights of interconnection, ensuring that new carriers are able to interconnect with the incumbent provider’s networks to enable customers of one network to make calls to those on another network. However New Zealand’s light handed regulation saw the telco sector relying on the generic Commerce Act to control any potentially monopolistic behaviour.

In what was to be the first of many legal battles in the sector, in 1991 the Commerce Commission began proceedings against Telecom alleging that in raising these costs during 1988 and 1989, the company had contravened section 36 of the Commerce Act. The slow turning of the wheels of justice, however, meant that four years later the Commerce Commission withdrew the action after concluding that the time and costs involved in pursuing the case to a conclusion would be greater than any benefits achieved, and that the case by then had little relevance to the industry.

In the 1992 Report on Telecommunications, the Commission noted: ‘Telecom makes the rules and other parties in the industry, by and large, play by them’.   In what would become an ongoing theme for the sector, the Commission’s enquiries conclusions were subsequently ruled to be beyond its remit.

 

Debates over Investment as competition makes little headway

By 1992, competition was emerging in the market – in particular from Clear Communications.  Clear entered the market with the intention of creating a nationwide network using fibre optic cables along New Zealand’s railway lines, courtesy of New Zealand Rail, to provide tolls and data services.

Ultimately, it set its sights on the local market and a long running interconnection dispute with Telecom – which reportedly cost around $8 million in fees and went all the way to London’s Privy Council where it was ruled that there hadn’t been use of its dominant position by Telecom to stifle Clear – became a feature of the New Zealand telecommunications scene for six long years.   But while Clear may have lead the early charge, others were also entering the market, including Kapiti Coast’s Kiwi Cable Company, which later became Saturn Communications and joined forces with Telstra to become TelstraSaturn.  By 1993 competition was emerging on the mobile front too, with BellSouth launching.

 

 

For TUANZ, increased competition, while much wanted and lobbied for, brought its own challenges.  The increased competition brought with it challenges for TUANZ’ user community, who faced a growing set of choices.  

In 1996 internet demand – and pricing pressures in traditional markets where Telecom now had burgeoning competition from multiple companies such as iHug and CLEAR– saw Telecom launch its own internet service provider, Xtra.   Telecom then moved its focus to ‘high speed’ internet in the form of ADSL,, branded as Jetstream, which would become a mainstay for the company’s internet access offerings. The company also became part of the Southern Cross Cable consortium, which was laying a fibre optic cable between Australia and New Zealand and the United States.

 

It’s just not working

By the late 1990s, TUANZ along with many other players in the industry felt it was clear that New Zealand’s pioneering hands-off deregulation of the industry wasn’t working and TUANZ wasn’t making much progress on the regulatory front. Much to Telecom’s annoyance, it would become a key focus for the industry body.

It would be a period of high activity for TUANZ, with on average, one major campaign a year including number portability, the wholesale access regime – the requirement that Telecom sell its services to competitors at regulated prices – local loop unbundling, mobile colocation, mobile roaming, and mobile termination rates.

A key catalyst in driving awareness of the issues within telecommunications sector to a wider audience was number portability. Something taken for granted today, it was a sore point in the late 1990s, when moving carriers meant changing phone numbers. For businesses in particular it was a huge barrier to changing telco provider and for consumers it tended to lock you into one mobile provider.

Pre the 1999 election, TUANZ had lobbied the Labour party  about the need for fundamental change and in its election manifesto Labour promised an inquiry into the telecommunications regulatory framework.   In 2000 with Labour in power, Paul Swain commissioned the Fletcher enquiry, which ultimately lead to industry-specific regulation in the form of the Telecommunications Act 2001 and the creation of the role of Telecommunications Commissioner.

 

 

For end users, the new act brought changes on the fixed line front, as providers jostled for attention with specials and new choices in plans.  Then in 2005 a Government review of the sector focused on the broadband market and highlighted concerns at a lack of improvement in New Zealand’s performance in the OECD in regards to broadband penetration. The review also suggested there was a lack of effective competition in the telecommunications market which ultimately lead to amendments in 2006 to the Telecommunications Act, giving greater power to the Commerce Commission for regulating the sector including introducing unbundled local loop as a regulated service.  

 

Fibre and full separation

Prior to the 2008 election, TUANZ, had been pushing for improved access networks for a number of years, arguing for fibre to the home and working strongly behind the scenes to encourage any new government to take a stand.  TUANZ’ work paid off and at a Wellington Chamber of Commerce luncheon, John Key as leader of the opposition, announced plans for a UFB programme.  National won the election, and the UFB project kicked off.

The UFB project came with a condition for Telecom, however. In order for it to be a partner in the UFB project it was required to structurally separate into a wholesale network business and a retail/mobile business.  This the company subsequently did creating two new companies in Telecom (now SPARK) and Chorus.

 

Future forward

New Zealand’s key telco sector players are incredibly buoyant about the future of the sector – and what it will provide New Zealand with.  While most agree there’s still work to do – and all have differing ideas of what that work entails – most believe the industry is in the best position it’s ever been in.  For TUANZ, the focus remains on driving New Zealand telecommunications forward to ensure New Zealand can make the most of the digitally connected world and encouraging New Zealand to be one of the top 10 countries for business usage according to the World Economic Forum global network readiness index by 2020.

For TUANZ the resolution of many of the recent big issues (until the next ones arise) means it can return to more of an education focus as it seeks to encourage local businesses to use technology to improve New Zealand’s economic prosperity.  And while TUANZ is continuing to help New Zealand make the most of a digitally connected world, it’s also working to bring fresh blood up through the industry, ensuring a vibrant future for the sector.  

With that in mind, TUANZ relaunched the FLINT (Future Leaders In Technology) programme for those at the beginning of their careers. The programme aims to enable future leaders to develop knowledge and be exposed to industry leaders and ideas so they too, can step up into senior roles with communication technology responsibility.

 

 

 

Honours Board of Leaders

Here we’ve compiled a complete list of the people who have given their time over the last 30 years – as well as the senior most employed staff member.

 
Year Chairperson Board Members CEO
Establishment Committee William de Hamel
Joe Stewart
John Englefield
Peter Cooke
Greg Barton
Ben Davis
Terry Ballard
Ray Hunt
 
1986/1987 Terry Ballard
William de Hamel (Secretary)
Peter Cooke (Treasurer)
Rodger Auld
Max Brown
Ben Davis
John Englefield
Joe Stewart
Bill Smith
Don Wallace
Patricia Greis Kerr
(Business Manager)
Jackie Tarr
(Administration) (Ernst & Whinney)
1987/1988 Terry Ballard
William de Hamel (Secretary)
Peter Cooke (Treasurer)
Peter Adams
Rodger Auld
Max Brown
Andrew Dean
Neil Mitchell
Ken Muir
Bill Smith
Don Wallace
Patricia Greis Kerr
(Business Manager)
Jackie Tarr
(Administration) (Ernst & Whinney)
1988/1989 Terry Ballard
William de Hamel (Secretary)
Peter Cooke (Treasurer)
Alex McFarland
Neil Mitchell
Bill Smith
Don Wallace
Malcolm Wheeler
Murray Young

Patricia Greis Kerr
(Business Manager)
Jackie Tarr
(Administration)
(Ernst & Whinney)

1989/1990 Terry Ballard
Murray Young (Secretary)
Peter Cooke (Treasurer)
Robert Amies
Nicolas Egerton
Graham Griffiths
Alex McFarlane
Peter McKenzie
Bill Smith
Graeme Thomson
Don Wallace
Patricia Greis Kerr
(Business Manager)
Sally Motion
(Administration)
(Ernst & Whinney)
1990/1991 Terry Ballard
Don Wallace (Vice Chairperson)
Murray Young (Secretary)
Peter Cooke (Treasurer)
Grant Burtenshaw
Nicolas Egerton
Graham Griffiths
Alex McFarlane
Peter McKenzie
Bill Smith
Graeme Thomson
Patricia Greis Kerr
(Business Manager)
Sally Motion
(Administration)

(Ernst & Young)
1991/1992 Don Wallace
Murray Young (Secretary)
Peter Cooke (Treasurer)
Terry Ballard
Grant Burtenshaw
Warwick Dixon
Nicolas Egerton
Graham Griffiths
Peter McKenzie
Roger Quayle
Angela Reynolds
Bill Smith
Patricia Greis Kerr
(Business Manager)
Jean Cordukes
(Administration)
(Ernst & Young)
1992/1993 Don Wallace
Grant Burtenshaw (Vice-Chairman)
William de Hamel (Secretary)
David Corrick
Mike Cronshaw
Warwick Dixon
Chris Marshall
Roger Quayle
Angela Reynolds
Bill Smith
Judith Speight
Patricia Greis Kerr
(Business Manager)
Jean Cordukes
(Administration)
(Ernst & Young)
1993/1994 Don Hollander


Grant Burtenshaw (Vice-Chairman)
William de Hamel (Secretary)
John Speakman (Treasurer)
Don Wallace (Past-Chairman)
Mike Cronshaw
Charles Fraser
Neil James
Deborah Matthews
Chris Marshall
Angela Reynolds
Judith Speight

Patricia Greis Kerr
(Business Manager) (to Nov 93)
Grant Forsyth (from Nov 93)
Anne Marinovich
(Office Manager)
1994/1995 Don Hollander
Grant Burtenshaw (Vice-Chairman)
Colin Thrush (Secretary)
John Speakman (Treasurer)
Peter Adams
Charles Fraser
Neil James
Deborah Matthews
Clive Raines
Angela Reynolds
Judith Speight
Don Wallace
Grant Forsyth
(Executive Director)
Anne Marinovich
(Office Manager)
1995/1996 Don Hollander
Grant Burtenshaw (Vice-Chairman)
Colin Thrush (Secretary)
Chris Bunce (Treasurer)
Emily Loughnan
Graham Smith
Clive Raines
Judith Speight
Grant Forsyth
(Executive Director)
1996/1997 Derek LeDayn
Judith Speight (Vice Chair)
Colin Thrush (Secretary)
Chris Bunce (Treasurer)
Neville Brown
John Houlker
John Kelly
Emily Loughnan
Deborah Matthews
Graham Smith
Don Wallace
Grant Forsyth
(Executive Director)
 
1997/1998 Judith Speight
John Kelly (Vice Chair)
Colin Thrush (Secretary)
Colin Mathieson (Treasurer)
Neville Brown
John Houlker
Emily Loughnan
Leo Neal
Jennifer Northover
Tony Randle
Graham Smith
Colin Taylor
Don Wallace
Grant Forsyth
(Executive Director)
 
1998/1999 Judith Speight
Colin Mathieson (Vice Chair)
Leo Neal (Secretary)
Graeme Osborne (Treasurer)
Janiene Bayliss
Jane Hindle
Chris Marshall
Jennifer Northover
Tony Randle
Mike Stobbs
Graham Smith
Colin Taylor
Don Wallace
Grant Forsyth
(Executive Director)
 
1999/2000 Judith Speight
Colin Mathieson (Vice Chair) (resigned August)
Graeme Osborne (Vice-chairman/Treasurer, Vice Chair from August)
Leo Neal (Secretary)
Janiene Bayliss (resigned August)
David Dickinson
Jane Hindle
George MacGibbon (from August)
Rohan Mendis
Jennifer Northover
Reg Russ
Mark Slessor-White (from August)
Don Wallace
Ernie Newman
2000/2001 Judith Speight
Graeme Osborne
(vice-chairman/treasurer)
Leo Neal (Secretary)
David Dickinson
Jane Hindle
George MacGibbon
Rohan Mendis
Don Wallace
Reg Russ
Jennifer Northover
Mark Slessor White

 

Ernie Newman
2001/2002 Judith Speight
Leo Neal (Secretary)
Reg Russ (Vice-Chairman)
Rohan Mendis (Treasurer)
David Dickinson
Ian Gwilt
Jane Hindle
Mark Jeffries
Graeme Osborne
Bill Smith
Greg Dyer
Don Wallace
Ernie Newman
2002/2003 Judith Speight
Rohan Mendis (Secretary, Treasurer)
Graeme Osborne (Vice-Chairman)
Merv Altments
Bill Smith
Egon Guttke
Jane Hindle
Nicola Jamieson
Mark Jaffries
Robert Keegan
Allan Tagg
Don Wallace
Ernie Newman
2003/2004 Graeme Osborne
Rohan Mendis (vice-chairman)
Mark Jeffries
Merv Altments (Secretary/Treasurer)
Bill Smith
Egon Guttke
Jane Hindle
Nicola Jamieson
Mark Jaffries
Robert Keegan
Allan Tagg
Don Wallace
Egon Guttke
Ernie Newman
2004/2005 Graeme Osborne
Rob Spray
Merv Altments (vice-chairman)
Bill Smith
Egon Guttke (secretary/treasurer)
Jane Hindle
Nicola Jamieson
Geoffrey  Handley
Robert Keegan
Allan Tagg
Don Wallace
Tom Eslinger 
Ernie Newman
2005/2006 Graeme Osborne
Mike Lancaster
Merv Altments (vice-chairman)
Bill Smith
Egon Guttke (secretary/treasurer)
Jane Hindle
Nicola Jamieson
Geoffrey  Handley
Robert Keegan
Allan Tagg
Don Wallace
Tom Eslinger 
Ernie Newman
2006/2007 Merv Altments
David Gatland
Egon Guttke
Michael Foley
Jane Hindle
Geraline Knox
Peter Muggleston
Chris O’Connell
Pat O’ Connell
Don Wallace
Ernie Newman
2007/2008 Merv Altments
David Gatland
Egon Guttke
Michael Foley
Jane Hindle
Geraline Knox
Peter Muggleston
Chris O’Connell (vice chairperson)
Pat O’ Connell
Doug Wilson
Rob Spray
Geraline Knox
Peter Muggleston
Ernie Newman
2008/2009 Merv Altments
David Gatland
Egon Guttke
Michael Foley
Jane Hindle
Geraline Knox
Peter Muggleston
Chris O’Connell (vice chairperson)
Pat O’ Connell
Doug Wilson
Rob Spray
Geraline Knox
Peter Muggleston
David Farrar
Ernie Newman
2009/2010 Chris O’Connell
Bruce Turner
David Boyes
David Gatland (Treasurer)
Doug Wilson
John Crisp
Kevin Drinkwater
Michael Foley
Pat O’Connell (Secretary)
Peter Muggleston
Tony Wickstead
Ernie Newman
2010/2011 Pat O’Connell
Bruce Turner
Chris O’Connell
David Gatland
Doug WIlson (Secretary)
John Crisp
Kevin Drinkwater (Treasurer)
Michael Foley
Richard Anderson
Tony WIckstead
Ernie Newman
(Jan-Sep)
2011/2012 Pat O’Connell
Doug Wilson (Secretary)
Kevin Drinkwater (Treasurer)
Chris O’Connell
David Gatland
Tony Wickstead
John Crisp
Rich Anderson
Marianne Archibald
Bruce Turner
Mike Foley
Paul Brislen
(From Feb)
2012/2013 Pat O’Connell
Doug Wilson (Deputy Chair)
Kevin Drinkwater (Treasurer)
Chris O’Connell
David Gatland
Tony Wickstead
John Crisp (Secretary)
Rich Anderson
Marianne Archibald
Bruce Turner
Mike Foley
Paul Brislen
2013/2014 Pat O’Connell
David Clarke
Marianne Archibald
John Crisp (Secretary)
Doug Wilson (Deputy Chair)
Kevin Drinkwater (Treasurer)
Mike Foley
David Gatland
Chris O’Connell
Bruce Turner
Paul Brislen
(Jan – Apr )
Craig Young
(Oct – )
2014/2015 Pat O’Connell
David Clarke
Marianne Archibald
John Crisp (Secretary)
Doug Wilson (Deputy Chair)
Kevin Drinkwater (Treasurer)
Mike Foley
David Gatland
Craig Young
2015/2016 Pat O’Connell
Liz Gosling (Deputy Chair)
Guy Alexander
Jenna Woolley
Maxine Elliott
Donna Spargo
Doug Wilson (Secretary)
Kevin Drinkwater (Treasurer)
Mike Foley
David Gatland
Craig Young
2016/2017 Pat O’Connell
Liz Gosling (Deputy Chair)
Guy Alexander (Finance Chair)
Jenna Woolley (Contact Officer)
Maxine Elliott
Donna Spargo
Tristan Illich
Robert McDonnell
Malcolm Condie
Vaughan Baker
Craig Young