A birth notice…

Wow!

Residential gigabit is getting born today.

In Taranaki, these tweets from Primo Wireless tell the story with improving speedtest results.

Not bad for a first attempt!  

Not bad for a first attempt!  

Now thats more like it

Now thats more like it

So first of all congratulations to Primo wireless for 2 things, one is giving it a bit of the old ‘Naki’ hard core attitude and seeing what they can do with a gig and secondly for being open about their testing and the results.

I’ve heard they’ve identified some hardware issues, thats to be expected but now they can get on with creating real gigabit products for their customers.

As you can see a premium 1gb/s product will be somewhere in the $200 – $400 range, which isn’t actually surprising and highlights the biggest unanswered question surrounding Chorus’s gigatown competition, even with the wholesale circuit being $27.50 cheaper than UFF the rest of the stack will have similar costs.

This makes me take articles like this with a grain of salt.

Anyway congratulations to Primo and UFF on turning an audacious idea into reality, bring on the giganation…

Update

They’ve keep playing over the weekend and this is the result:

Thats hitting a local server, so UFF's gigabit service is genuine

Thats hitting a local server, so UFF’s gigabit service is genuine

And this is what they get going to other places A+ indeed

And this is what they get going to other places A+ indeed

 

I’ve got to be in New Plymouth tomorrow so I’ll make a detour to Inglewood to meet these guys

4 replies
  1. Chris O'Connell
    Chris O'Connell says:

    This is why Spark (Telecom) called for a ‘giganation’ this week, the Chorus gig spec is 1000/500 which is much more cloud friendly. That said my current VDSL connection is also pretty asynchronous yet most cloud apps I use run fine.

    Also backups and restores happen asynchronously as well, I learnt this years ago when I implemented a realtime back up system in my ad agency. The studio was on a 1gb/s ethernet sub-LAN and were constantly backing up a mirrored RAID, this was backed up onto DLT tape every night and then archived monthly. Basically we needed to be able to restore ‘yesterday’ in the event of a disaster, we tried running back up over our 100 mb/s CityLink fibre connection but it couldn’t cope.

    Remember we’re talking residential gigabit here so I don’t think many will have my old needs.

    Reply
  2. Chris O'Connell
    Chris O'Connell says:

    This is why Spark (Telecom) called for a ‘giganation’ this week, the Chorus gig spec is 1000/500 which is much more cloud friendly. That said my current VDSL connection is also pretty asynchronous yet most cloud apps I use run fine.

    Also backups and restores happen asynchronously as well, I learnt this years ago when I implemented a realtime back up system in my ad agency. The studio was on a 1gb/s ethernet sub-LAN and were constantly backing up a mirrored RAID, this was backed up onto DLT tape every night and then archived monthly. Basically we needed to be able to restore ‘yesterday’ in the event of a disaster, we tried running back up over our 100 mb/s CityLink fibre connection but it couldn’t cope.

    Remember we’re talking residential gigabit here so I don’t think many will have my old needs.

    Reply
  3. Kevin L (Dunedin)
    Kevin L (Dunedin) says:

    With the upload test in the first being approx 20x slower than download and the second approx 30x its not looking very good for cloud storage/online backup yet. e.g. if it took 30mins to download your saved data at speedtest 1 result, it would have taken approx 10hrs to upload it first.

    Reply
  4. Kevin L (Dunedin)
    Kevin L (Dunedin) says:

    With the upload test in the first being approx 20x slower than download and the second approx 30x its not looking very good for cloud storage/online backup yet. e.g. if it took 30mins to download your saved data at speedtest 1 result, it would have taken approx 10hrs to upload it first.

    Reply

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